Author: billboyd

ACTNOWHello, CarbonWA friends:

Check out this recent Mother Jones article, “Will Washington Pass the Nation’s First Carbon Tax?” featuring CarbonWA and the upcoming legislative session. As we outlined in our legislative analysis, the path is tough this session, but not impossible. Stay tuned for more on 2018, but first, read on for an update on our fundraising match.

Thanks to the tremendous support of dozens of donors we’ve raised $4300 completing our match well before the end-of-the-month deadline! If you’ve already given to the match — thank you. By completing this match, we can fund our operation through the end of the year. However, to get a running start into next year our board has offered to match an additional $2,500 bringing the new fundraising goal to $6500! (more…)

Hello, CarbonWA friends: We hope you enjoyed the first part of our 2018 series, focusing on the prospects for legislative action. Read on for the initiative prospects for 2018! But first, check out these recent media hits from CarbonWA including “Washington groups push renewed carbon tax push” in Carbon Pulse, a letter to the editor from supporter Zach Stednick in the Seattle Times (“Washington can distinguish itself as the first state to implement a carbon tax”), and in the Washington State Wire (“A look ahead to a 2018 climate initiative“). We’ll kick off our initiative analysis with this quote from the Wire story:

“There are those of us who are looking at these multiple efforts and thinking ‘nothing is for sure yet’, so we need to make a plan to ensure something goes to voters that is politically viable and effective at reducing carbon.”

The Landscape 

The landscape for a ballot initiative in 2018 is defined largely by voter turnout and sentiment towards taxes and climate.

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Kyle Murphy - 1Despite the obstacles standing in the way of climate legislation, Kyle Murphy, Executive Director of Carbon Washington, says there will be a 2018 climate initiative.

According to a legislation prospect analysis from Carbon Washington, the landscape to pass climate legislation will be tougher this year than it was in 2017. The property tax increase last year will likely hamper the willingness of legislators to come back to the table with another potential tax increase, and trying to find a compromise on revenue continues to divide those who wish to see climate legislation pass.

“We find that for carbon pricing and big climate legislation, this legislative session is not impossible, but it’s hard,” says Murphy. “However, there will be a 2018 Climate Initiative. It’s unclear yet who will lead it and what the substance of the policy will be, but we intend to make it a reality.”

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Hello, CarbonWA friends: Today’s message launches the first of a multi-part series looking ahead to the climate politics of 2018. We’ll be covering the political prospects for legislative action, initiatives, and more!

The Landscape

The last legislative session was a golden opportunity to pass a price on carbon: both parties knew they needed to raise revenue to fund education, our efforts over multiple years proved that there is at least some interest in carbon pricing from both parties, and the looming threat of another ballot initiative — from the Alliance, The Nature Conservancy, or CarbonWA — all increased the pressure to address climate. While we think there were enough votes to pass a climate package, that didn’t come to pass for reasons we outlined in July.

Looking ahead, the prospects this legislative session look even tougher for a few reasons:

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Join ACT NOW in advocating for a price on carbon. We need help from volunteers, organizers, and activists to shape a winnable policy for 2018.

We meet monthly via Zoom (join by phone or web). There are no membership fees or requirements, just an interest in building a coalition.

Topics:

How to engage the public by discussing extreme climate events
Thursday, November 2 | 5 – 6 p.m.

In light of tragic climatic events happening around the world, many people are asking questions about how we can help the survivors and prevent future harm. These questions are interrelated with questions about current politics and climate science. Join us as we talk about the impacts of witnessing these events and how you can engage in thoughtful discussion with the public.

How to push back on EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt
Thursday, December 7 | 5 – 6 p.m.

Join us for a broad discussion on how the Trump administration is impacting the EPA, and what citizens are doing to ensure our regulatory agencies continue to protect environmental health.

What’s happening with climate change policy in other states?
Thursday, January 4 | 5 – 6 p.m.

Learn about and discuss how other states are tackling climate change — including Montana, Oregon and Colorado. Learn about cooperation among states, and how grassroots organizations are shifting the conversation from “Should we address climate change?” to “How should we address climate change?”

 

To join ACT NOW calls, install Zoom to your computer or phone.

Join via web: Go to https://zoom.us/j/2590508548.

Join via phone +16699006833 and enter meeting ID (259 050 8548).

A report prepared by Carbon Washington members and funded by the Carbon Tax Center says that loans tied to property (rather than individuals) would help propel clean energy and energy-efficiency measures — but Washington State’s constitution prohibits them.

The report is called “Washington State Climate Change Education and Policy Exploration.” The section on “Barriers to Property-Assessed Clean Energy Programs in Washington State” explains how property-assessed clean energy — or PACE — programs work.

Such programs provide “financing for clean energy and energy efficiency measures for commercial and residential buildings, in which the financing is attached to the property, not the owner. As of mid-2017, nineteen states have active PACE programs with funded projects, and another fourteen states, plus Washington D.C., have active PACE legislation.” PACE programs address a critical contributor to our carbon footprint — aging, inefficient buildings.

The report says the PACE approach has been effective. “Since 2009, commercial PACE programs have financed an estimated 1,030 projects, providing approximately $400 million in financing for energy updates. During the same period, residential PACE programs have financed over 150,000 projects through $3.7 billion in home upgrades.”

About half the upgrades deal with energy efficiency, such as HVAC systems, LED lighting, installing energy efficiency appliances, and water conservation upgrades. In second place: renewable energy upgrades (mainly solar panel installations). These upgrades dramatically reduce the energy and environmental impacts of the renovated buildings.

PACE has been discussed in Washington State, but a thorough public review of the opportunity for Washington to enact such a program has not been undertaken until now. Unfortunately, PACE financing is not available in Washington, nor is it likely to be without amending the state’s constitution. PACE attaches the loan bill to the property tax and uses the authority of the state as a financial entity to collect the loan payments. The constitution prohibits the state from acting as a creditor or a loan pass through in a provision commonly referred to as “lending of the state’s credit.”

The report’s authors consulted constitutional law experts about a potential work-around. The bottom line: “The only resolution for this structure of the program appears to be a constitutional amendment.”

The report was researched and written by Megan Conaway, Rheanna Johnston, Kyle Murphy and Blake Wedekind.

 

Hello, CarbonWA friends: The smoke has finally cleared over western Washington, but we are still in the dog days of summer. We thought this would be a good time to zoom out, look back, and look ahead.

Last August: 

In mid-August of 2016 we sent an email blast announcing news that we had received the endorsement of Republican State Senator Joe Fain (for I-732) and that we had just interviewed with the Seattle Times endorsement board. We were pretty excited at the time, because after being told we wouldn’t get a single Republican to support climate action, we had just snagged our 3rd legislative endorsement. While we proved that you can get some Republicans to the table on climate change, we haven’t been able to secure a breakthrough with the majority of the party, and it remains to be whether they are ready to lead on this issue. (more…)

Photo by Olu Eletu

Photo by Olu Eletu

Carbon Washington is mapping its future — and we invite you to consider coming along with us on the journey. We’re looking for a Treasurer to provide financial oversight and a Development Chair to assist with fundraising. Here are the descriptions of each position, along with info on how to apply:

If those roles don’t sound like you — but you’d still like to help — you can get involved by writing your legislator, subscribing to our newsletter, and donating to help us get ready for 2018. Thanks for your interest in helping us accelerate clean energy!

The legislature has passed a budget deal, and despite our efforts, it does not include a price on carbon. We did a heckuva job putting a carbon tax in play this legislative session, holding two lobby days engaging hundreds of people around the state, creating and leading the ACT NOW coalition, and placing numerous media pieces.

However, the legislature opted to raise property taxes, sales tax, and close a number of tax breaks to raise revenue. While the budget deal allocates some funding for the Clean Air Rule, and closes an oil refinery tax break. We are concerned that the legislature failed to address climate change in a major way and that the negotiations were held in secret, without time for public scrutiny.

Write to your senator and both your representatives letting them know how you feel about this. Feel free to include some or all of the points in our recent media statement. You can write your own letter or use this one to get you started. (The link automatically addresses your emails to the proper legislators.)

You might also express your strong support for a carbon tax in the 2018 legislative session. Our legislators do listen. And when they get enough input, they’ve been known to change their positions. (They like getting re-elected!)

Thanks for supporting a carbon tax — and for all you’re doing to help make it a reality.

MEDIA STATEMENT (Contact: Samara Villasenor, samara@greatworkcommunications.com, 425.255.0890)

Climate change
Washington’s children have a constitutional right to both an adequate education and a livable climate. While lawmakers took steps to fully fund K-12 education, they failed — for the third year in a row — to seriously consider bills that would substantially reduce carbon emissions and mitigate the unavoidable impacts of climate change.

As in 2015, House and Senate leaders missed a golden opportunity to solve two problems at once, by putting a price on carbon pollution to both reduce emissions and help meet the state’s funding needs. Democrats neglected to walk their climate talk, failing to bring any of the four carbon tax bills put forward this session to a vote in the House. Meanwhile, some key Republicans continue to espouse the false notion that a carbon tax would hurt the state economy, despite clear evidence to the contrary from multiple studies and the experience implementing a carbon tax in British Columbia.

Our grassroots members worked tirelessly during the session to educate their representatives on the urgent need to protect our climate. We are grateful for their efforts and support. We also commend Sen. Hobbs, Sen. Palumbo, Rep. Fitzgibbon, and Gov. Inslee for proposing meaningful carbon pricing policies this year.

Given the Legislature’s unwillingness to act, it’s clear that taking meaningful steps to reduce carbon pollution will be up to the citizens of Washington. Carbon Washington’s next step will be to explore potential ballot initiatives that will reduce emissions and accelerate the transition to clean energy — in an effective, equitable, economically sound, and politically viable manner. We look forward to working with civic, environmental, business, and social justice leaders to get a winning measure on the 2018 ballot.

We can no longer ignore the threat that climate change poses to our state’s people, environment, and economy. All of us have a moral obligation to protect the children of today, and future generations, from the dangerous impacts of climate change. There is no more time for delay. We need to ACT NOW.