Author: billboyd

Submitted by Mike Massa, Board Co-Chair of Carbon Washington

January 16, 2018

Thank you, Chair Carlyle and the members of the committee, for this opportunity to provide testimony in support of SB 6203.

Mike Massa 1I am writing on behalf of Carbon Washington, a statewide, nonpartisan, grassroots organization focused on accelerating the transition to a vibrant clean-energy economy. We advocate for policies to reduce carbon pollution in ways that are effective, fair, economically sound, and politically feasible.

We believe that pricing carbon pollution is a necessary step for reaching our state’s emission reduction goals. SB 6203 is a constructive proposal that gets many of the big policy pieces right.

This bill proposes a steadily rising carbon tax covering most of the state economy, creating a strong market incentive for all of us to use energy more efficiently and transition to cleaner sources. That price signal will also motivate both entrepreneurs and established companies to develop innovative clean energy solutions that drive economic growth. Importantly, the proposed tax rate is predictable, enabling businesses and households to plan their budgets. In addition, the scope of exemptions is relatively narrow; and the requirement for EITE’s to demonstrate a substantial impact on their competitiveness before receiving one is responsible.

If there is a Legislative consensus to spend some of the revenue from pricing carbon pollution, then we would prefer to see the funds directed mainly towards two areas: 1) offsetting the economic impact of the tax on low-income households, and 2) projects that further reduce emissions and help our communities adapt to the unavoidable impacts of climate change. We also believe it is important to include strong planning and oversight processes to ensure that taxpayer money is spent effectively and efficiently.

SB 6203 appears to meet those criteria, though we would like to see an analysis of the projected financial impact of this bill on households in the bottom 40% by income. We encourage you to strengthen the relief for vulnerable citizens if modeling shows their net tax burden would increase under this proposal.

Finally, we encourage you to discuss ways to provide some tax relief for middle-income households, who are struggling to get by in both economically depressed areas of Washington and increasingly unaffordable urban centers.

In conclusion, we believe that SB 6203 is a good starting point for acting on the state’s responsibility to protect its people and natural resources from the threat of climate change. Thank you for considering our remarks. Carbon Washington looks forward to working with you on bipartisan clean-energy policies that enable our state to prosper.

Watch the video on TVW.

CO2 smokestack

Hello, CarbonWA friends:

Read on for the latest news of carbon tax news as the legislative session begins! But first, we are concerned about what appears to be a coordinated effort to lower expectations going into the session. After 10 years of inaction on climate, key legislators are now saying 60 days isn’t enough time to get climate done (see here, here, and here). This reminds us of the kind of thing you might tell your teacher in elementary school: “I haven’t made much progress on my homework assignment (for over 10 years!), and because the due date is coming up so soon, I should be given extra time.” But we remember when the legislature passed the 2014 Boeing tax cuts in 4 days, so we aren’t buying the not-enough-time story. We know this session will be a big lift, but the legislature’s assignment to protect the climate and future generations is already overdue.

Please join us in raising expectations that the legislature will pass a climate policy, because they have the time, skill, and mandate to do so. You can write a letter to the editor of your local paper, contact your legislators on social media, or write them directly to tell them you expect action. (more…)

Inslee State of State 2018

MEDIA STATEMENT ON GOVERNOR’S CARBON PROPOSAL

SEATTLE, WA – January 9, 2018 — Carbon Washington welcomes Gov. Inslee’s proposal. We believe it’s a meaningful start that gets many important things right.

We support effective, equitable, economically sound, evidence-based, and politically feasible carbon-reduction policies. We are encouraged by what we heard outlined in the Governor’s carbon tax proposal today, and we will continue to review and provide analysis on it in the coming days.

We believe effective climate policy requires bipartisan support, and the Governor’s proposal offers a great opportunity to begin overdue conversations on both sides of the aisle — as well as from Washington’s environmental, business and progressive groups — about how to move forward.

The legislature has already waited too long to take action on climate. As we’ve said many times, the climate won’t wait. 60 days is plenty of time for the legislature to act on this issue. We urge and expect our elected officials to demonstrate leadership and take much-needed action on climate this session. (more…)

Happy New Year 2018

Hello, CarbonWA friends: Happy new year! A number of you were unable to read our previous newsletter due to a technical glitch, so to catch you up: We published a blog analyzing whether a city could pursue a carbon price to reach its climate goals, and we announced that we exceeded our match (!!!) from November, raising over $8,000 against our original goal of $4,000. Read on for a summary of our work in 2017 in what was a year of transition and advocacy for CarbonWA, along with an update on upcoming events for the legislative session.

2018 Legislative Session Sign Up! 

As the legislative session kicks off, review our analysis of the upcoming legislative session’s prospects, check out the recent support for carbon pricing from Lands Commissioner Hilary Franz, see this piece in the Olympian from Representative Drew MacEwen opposing a carbon tax (where he holds up the Scandinavian nations as models, but fails to mention that they all rely on carbon-pricing systems…whoops!), then see the recent announcement from The Nature Conservancy, Quinault Tribe and the Alliance for Jobs and Clean Energy that they’ve agreed to work together on a potential initiative. Be sure to stay tuned for more on potential initiatives and an analysis of the governor’s forthcoming carbon pricing proposal(more…)

Gov. Jay Inslee 2San Francisco, 18 December (Argus) — Washington Governor Jay Inslee (D) will try to take advantage of a new Democratic majority in the Legislature to pass a carbon pricing bill next year.

Inslee on 14 December proposed using a price on carbon to support the state’s primary and secondary education system and end a long-running fight with lawmakers over how best to comply with a 2012 court ruling that said the state had not adequately funded its schools.

“This is the best way that I believe is both fiscally responsible, fulfills our educational mandate to our kids, and simultaneously gives our kids a Washington state that is not ravaged by climate change,” Inslee said. “We need to act.” . . .

Advocates for a carbon price in Washington say that the momentum is on their side.

“We think it is a question of when, not if, the state will adopt a carbon pricing program,” said Kyle Murphy, executive director of Carbon Washington, which sponsored an unsuccessful carbon tax ballot initiative in 2016.

Murphy framed Inslee’s proposal as an opening bid and said he expects lawmakers to submit different versions of carbon pricing bills next year.

 (more…)

ACTNOWHello, CarbonWA friends:

Check out this recent Mother Jones article, “Will Washington Pass the Nation’s First Carbon Tax?” featuring CarbonWA and the upcoming legislative session. As we outlined in our legislative analysis, the path is tough this session, but not impossible. Stay tuned for more on 2018, but first, read on for an update on our fundraising match.

Thanks to the tremendous support of dozens of donors we’ve raised $4300 completing our match well before the end-of-the-month deadline! If you’ve already given to the match — thank you. By completing this match, we can fund our operation through the end of the year. However, to get a running start into next year our board has offered to match an additional $2,500 bringing the new fundraising goal to $6500! (more…)

Hello, CarbonWA friends: We hope you enjoyed the first part of our 2018 series, focusing on the prospects for legislative action. Read on for the initiative prospects for 2018! But first, check out these recent media hits from CarbonWA including “Washington groups push renewed carbon tax push” in Carbon Pulse, a letter to the editor from supporter Zach Stednick in the Seattle Times (“Washington can distinguish itself as the first state to implement a carbon tax”), and in the Washington State Wire (“A look ahead to a 2018 climate initiative“). We’ll kick off our initiative analysis with this quote from the Wire story:

“There are those of us who are looking at these multiple efforts and thinking ‘nothing is for sure yet’, so we need to make a plan to ensure something goes to voters that is politically viable and effective at reducing carbon.”

The Landscape 

The landscape for a ballot initiative in 2018 is defined largely by voter turnout and sentiment towards taxes and climate.

 (more…)

Kyle Murphy - 1Despite the obstacles standing in the way of climate legislation, Kyle Murphy, Executive Director of Carbon Washington, says there will be a 2018 climate initiative.

According to a legislation prospect analysis from Carbon Washington, the landscape to pass climate legislation will be tougher this year than it was in 2017. The property tax increase last year will likely hamper the willingness of legislators to come back to the table with another potential tax increase, and trying to find a compromise on revenue continues to divide those who wish to see climate legislation pass.

“We find that for carbon pricing and big climate legislation, this legislative session is not impossible, but it’s hard,” says Murphy. “However, there will be a 2018 Climate Initiative. It’s unclear yet who will lead it and what the substance of the policy will be, but we intend to make it a reality.”

 (more…)

Image result for olympia capitol

Hello, CarbonWA friends: Today’s message launches the first of a multi-part series looking ahead to the climate politics of 2018. We’ll be covering the political prospects for legislative action, initiatives, and more!

The Landscape

The last legislative session was a golden opportunity to pass a price on carbon: both parties knew they needed to raise revenue to fund education, our efforts over multiple years proved that there is at least some interest in carbon pricing from both parties, and the looming threat of another ballot initiative — from the Alliance, The Nature Conservancy, or CarbonWA — all increased the pressure to address climate. While we think there were enough votes to pass a climate package, that didn’t come to pass for reasons we outlined in July.

Looking ahead, the prospects this legislative session look even tougher for a few reasons:

 (more…)

ACT NOW (Advocates for a Carbon Tax NOW) is a growing coalition of volunteers and more than 30 organizations including Carbon Washington, Audubon Washington, Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL), League of Women Voters, American Sustainable Business Council, Conservatives for Environmental Reform and others that want to see a carbon tax pass during this legislative session. (You can see the entire list of members and read more about our mission here.)

If you are a part of an organization that would like to join the ACT NOW coalition, email Kyle@carbonwa.org and let’s chat!

Join ACT NOW in advocating for a price on carbon. We need help from volunteers, organizers, and activists to shape a winnable policy for 2018.

Through March 9 (throughout the 2018 legislative session) we will meet remotely on every first and third Thursday. Email megan@carbonwa.org to get the meeting log-in information.

January 18: 5 p.m. – 6 p.m.
February 1: 5 p.m. – 6 p.m.
February 15: 5 p.m. – 6 p.m.
March 1: 5 p.m. – 6 p.m.
March 15: 5 p.m. – 6 p.m.

We meet monthly via Zoom (join by phone or web). There are no membership fees or requirements, just an interest in building a coalition.

To join ACT NOW calls, install Zoom to your computer or phone.

Join via web: Go to https://zoom.us/j/2590508548.

Join via phone +16699006833 and enter meeting ID (259 050 8548).