December 2019

Agriculture produces about 9 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. But 80 miles east of Seattle, a small farm along the Yakima River is proving that agriculture can store carbon in the soil, instead — in a big way.

Spoon Full Farm is jointly run by four determined young farmers who are out to grow produce and meat in ways that maximize their taste and nutrition — while strengthening and enriching the soil with large quantities of carbon.

One of those farmers is Mericos Rhodes. He was studying philosophy at Williams College in Massachusetts when he attended a lecture by an innovative cattle rancher. “He was running around on stage yelling about soil microbes,” says Rhodes, “and describing how rotational grazing of bison built soil fertility and massive stores of carbon in the Midwest. This guy really loved his life. I wanted what he was having.”

A few years later, Rhodes’ mom and stepdad bought what is now Spoon Full Farm. “I’d been serving the Kool-Aid of carbon farming to them,” he says. “After they’d owned the land for about a year, a few friends of mine and I moved out there and started farming.” (more…)

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We are thankful for all you gave this Giving Tuesday,

Thanks to the roughly 45 donors who have helped us raise over $18,000 in our matching drive! We exceeded our original $10,000 target almost two-fold! Your financial contributions enable us to keep our Sustainable Farms work going through the legislative session while also giving us bandwidth to work on carbon pricing and other climate action policies. If you missed out on the match please still consider donating to CarbonWA — you can give online or mail a check to PO Box 85565, Seattle, WA 98145.

CarbonWA featured at next Climate Science on Tap 12/16

Please join CarbonWA at the next Climate Science on Tap Happy Hour Monday 12/16 at Optimism Brewing. Cascadia Climate Action will be hosting an informative discussion featuring CarbonWA’s Greg Rock and other experts on the role of farms in solving the climate crisis. Family and dog-friendly!

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