Author: billboyd

On Feb. 7, an exciting coalition of climate organizations, small farmers, and large farm organizations came together to testify in support of a revised version of the Sustainable Farms and Fields bill (SB 5947) in front of the House Rural Development, Agriculture, and Natural Resources committee. (Photo: A diverse panel advocating for SB 5947: the Farm Bureau, the Dairy Commission, CarbonWA, and the Nature Conservancy)

A partial list of the SB 5947 supporters: 

The Nature Conservancy Tilth Alliance Washington State Dairy Federation
Carbon Washington Washington Young Farmer Coalition Washington State Farm Bureau
Washington Farmer Veterans Coalition Washington Association of Wheat Growers Washington Cattleman’s Association
Taylor Shellfish Wilcox Farms And 115 farms and organizations who joined the letter of support

In 2019, SB 5947 did not advance out of the House Rural Development, Agriculture, and Natural Resources committee in part due to concerns from several agricultural stakeholders. Throughout the summer and fall of 2019 Carbon Washington worked with partners to reach out to the farming community to improve the bill and build support for its passage in 2020.

Today, those outreach efforts paid off. At the Feb. 7 public hearing, 81 stakeholders supported the bill, while 0 opposed the bill.

CarbonWA board policy chair Greg Rock talks about prospects for the bill in the latest edition of CarbonCast(more…)

Klickitat Canyon Winery in Lyle, Wash., is proving that respect for nature is good business — and that vintners can care about both grapes and meadowlarks.

The winery was founded 30 years ago by Dr. Robin Dobson, whose main job is working as an ecologist for the U.S. Forest Service. When Dobson decided to retire from winemaking, his son Kiva took over the business.

“I grew up doing this,” Kiva says. “I also studied natural resources and biology. When Dad said he was done with the winery, I said I’ll give it a shot.”

Klickitat Canyon Winery is almost directly across the Columbia from Hood River, Ore. It includes 7 acres of grapes, 7 acres used for other crops, and 20 acres of oak woodland, which they leave as natural habitat.

The winery produces about 500 cases of wine per year. Those include Organic Estate Syrah and Organic Meadowlark Gold, which the winery’s website describes as “a lively wine sourced from our Meadowlark Vineyard. A blend of Grenache Blanc, Marsanne, and Viognier that creates grapefruit flavors with hints of wildflowers and earthiness on the nose.” Other varieties are made with grapes from nearby vineyards.

One reason Kiva took over the winery was his desire to continue Robin’s approach to farming — which the pair calls eco-dynamic agriculture. “By reintroducing the native wildflowers and bunch grasses between the rows and around the periphery,” he says, “we strive to increase biodiversity as much as possible. As a result, our vineyard has become a continuation of the surrounding environment, as opposed to an oasis for non-native and sometimes harmful pests. We think of it as a form of agricultural habitat restoration.” (more…)

Jessie Martin

Since 2015, when Carbon Washington became the first organization in the U.S. to put a carbon tax on a statewide ballot (I-732), it has been an active participant in state government, working closely with concerned citizens and elected officials to pass meaningful and pragmatic climate policies that work for as many people as possible.

Under the leadership of Kyle Murphy, Carbon Washington has been at the forefront of climate action in the state. With a dedicated team of volunteers and a highly engaged base across the state, Carbon Washington has organized legislative action and ballot measures that led the nation, developed insightful policy analysis, and supported climate candidates who won close races. All of this has been done with a commitment to making a meaningful difference while generating broad support across Washington.

After nearly five years of leadership with Carbon Washington, Kyle is stepping back to focus on his studies as a second-year student at the University of Washington School of Law. Continuing the organization’s mission of increasing demand for climate action and fighting for smart carbon policies, Carbon Washington is pleased to announce the appointment of Jessie Martin as the new executive director.

Jessie brings more than a decade of diverse, cross-functional, leadership experience in the corporate, public, and non-profit sectors. Most recently, she served as executive director of Earth Economics, where she developed strategies to harness the power of markets to redirect capital toward nature-based solutions to urban and rural challenges. (more…)

 

by Adam Maxwell and Douglas Ray, PhD

This article appeared in the Seattle Times on Jan. 13, 2020

During a short legislative session, conventional wisdom dictates that only a few small bills will pass into law, most likely on a partisan basis. Our organizations, however, choose not to accept conventional wisdom. As we have in previous legislative sessions, we will continue to work to pass several important climate bills this session while encouraging legislators — both Democrat and Republican — to support policies that protect people and birds from the worst effects of climate change.

Significant progress is possible. We know this because of our state’s tradition of transcending partisanship in the name of conservation. In 2020, elected officials can pass smart policies that reduce emissions in our state, while supporting rural economies.

So, back to that “conventional wisdom.”

Conventional wisdom No. 1: Don’t expect too much in a short legislative session.

While this might make sense in the normal course of things, we aren’t living in “normal times.” The impacts of the climate crisis are clear, here in our backyard and around the world. Audubon’s research shows that if we don’t cut emissions 45% by 2030 and reach net-zero emissions by midcentury, two-thirds of North American birds will be vulnerable to extinction. It’s not just the birds that are impacted. Drought, sea-level rise and climatic shifts threaten our whole economy and way of life.

Against this backdrop, we expect legislators to advance effective climate policy, every single year. (more…)

The 2020 legislative session began on January 13th. It is a short 60-day session so Carbon Washington staff, board members, volunteers, and supporters have been working hard to lay the groundwork to advance important climate legislation.

Sustainable Farms and Fields Progress

Over 75 farms, food systems stakeholders, and environmental organizations from across the state have endorsed the Sustainable Farms and Fields campaign. This strong support underscores that effective climate policy can also benefit farm businesses and rural communities. Read this article to find out why Spoon Full Farm, a farm in Thorp, Washington, has endorsed Sustainable Farms and Fields and how they sequester carbon, improve fertility, and build healthy soil.

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Spoon Full Farm has endorsed Sustainable Farms and Fields

We expect that the Sustainable Farms and Fields bill (SB 5947) will be reintroduced in the Senate early in the legislative session. Now is a great time to call your state Senator to express your support for the bill and ask them to pass effective climate solutions, including SB 5947, that benefit communities across Washington State. (more…)

Agriculture produces about 9 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. But 80 miles east of Seattle, a small farm along the Yakima River is proving that agriculture can store carbon in the soil, instead — in a big way.

Spoon Full Farm is jointly run by four determined young farmers who are out to grow produce and meat in ways that maximize their taste and nutrition — while strengthening and enriching the soil with large quantities of carbon.

One of those farmers is Mericos Rhodes. He was studying philosophy at Williams College in Massachusetts when he attended a lecture by an innovative cattle rancher. “He was running around on stage yelling about soil microbes,” says Rhodes, “and describing how rotational grazing of bison built soil fertility and massive stores of carbon in the Midwest. This guy really loved his life. I wanted what he was having.”

A few years later, Rhodes’ mom and stepdad bought what is now Spoon Full Farm. “I’d been serving the Kool-Aid of carbon farming to them,” he says. “After they’d owned the land for about a year, a few friends of mine and I moved out there and started farming.” (more…)

Over $5,000 raised toward our $7,500 match!

Give now to double your gift!

Thanks to over 25 donors who have helped us raise over $5,300 towards our $7,500 match to support our Sustainable Farms Campaign! You can help by donating now to help us hit our match. Funds raised go towards supporting our Sustainable Farms staff (meet Noa!), growing our coalition, lobbying in Olympia for the passage of SB 5947, and building broader awareness through events, like an upcoming presentation in Spokane at Forza Coffee at 5 pm on 10/24 and media (like The Washington Wire). Your gift goes directly to a lean, mean campaign for bipartisan legislation that will. cut. carbon. emissions.

More farms join our coalition!

Since our last newsletter, we have launched a sign-on letter for farms, environmental organizations, and other partners to sign in order to demonstrate the growing support for SB 5947 and climate-friendly farming practices broadly. Almost immediately, 7 farm or farming organizations joined us. We expect many more to join us in the coming months ahead of the next legislative session. You can help by sharing the attached letter with farms, farming and food organizations, environmental groups, and businesses so they can sign on. To officially sign on, please send an email to Noa@carbonwa.org demonstrating an appropriate officer of the organization approves of signing the letter and include a logo. (more…)

Kyle Murphy has been CarbonWA’s executive director since 2016 (and campaign co-chair before that). Kyle is now in his second year of law school and needs to focus on the demanding curriculum. Thank you, Kyle, for all you’ve done to help CarbonWA become a force for cleaning up Washington’s carbon emissions.

CarbonWA is now looking for a talented administrator, team leader, communicator, fundraiser, political strategist and more to take on the executive director role. This is your opportunity to help take CarbonWA to the next level of fundraising capability, volunteer mobilization, and legislative success.

Sound like you? We’d love to hear from you. Please read the job description, then send your cover letter and resume to jobs@carbonwa.org.

We’ll start reviewing applications on October 14.

Thanks for your interest!

Image result for 21 acres farm

Will You Invest in Climate-Friendly Farming Today?

CarbonWA’s campaign for climate-friendly farms and ranches needs your help!

Last legislative session SB 5947, a bill to support climate-friendly farming, moved through the Senate with bipartisan support led by Senators McCoy (D) and Schoesler (R). Senate Bill 5947 is the first step towards Carbon Washington’s goal of supporting our farming economy while maximizing the potential to use farm and prairie lands to fight climate change. You can learn more about the bill here and here. A CarbonWA supporter just offered to increase our matching amount from $5,000 to $7,500 to support this campaign. Please give today to help us take full advantage of the match!

A donor stepped up to increase the match from $5,000 to $7,500!

Can you give now?

(21 Acres Farm hosted CarbonWA at their fall harvest celebration)

We are already making progress! (more…)

Noa Kay is joining CarbonWA as sustainable farms campaign manager.

Noa earned masters degrees in Education and Public Health and has over 16 years of experience working as an educator and public policy researcher. Throughout her career, Noa has worked collaboratively with families, stakeholders, partner organizations, and elected officials. Recently, Noa’s commitment to improving both human and environmental health led her to launch a small no-till vegetable farm. She spends her time outside of work hiking, trail running, and cooking.

“We’re thrilled that Noa is part of our team,” says Kyle Murphy, CarbonWA executive director. “She brings the right mix of background experience in public policy, hands-on farming experience, and strong communication skills to the position.

“Noa will lead our coalition in a broad outreach and education effort to showcase the potential of climate-friendly farming practices. She will also work with our lobbying team to steward SB 5947 to success in 2020.” SB 5947 establishes a sustainable farms and fields grant program.

Other CarbonWA members, including Policy Chair Greg Rock, CarbonWA Vice Chair Peter Kelly, Melinda McBride and the broader advocacy and communication teams will continue to provide support on the sustainable farming campaign.

Adds Murphy: “We are especially grateful to the donors, large and small, who helped to make this hire happen!”