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Moving Washington State toward zero carbon emissions

Carbon Washington is part of ACT NOW

ACT NOW (Advocates for a Carbon Tax NOW) is a growing coalition of volunteers and more than 30 organizations including Carbon Washington, Audubon Washington, Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL), League of Women Voters, American Sustainable Business Council, Conservatives for Environmental Reform, and others that want to see a carbon tax pass here in Washington State.
 

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Support Climate Action on Giving Tuesday

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Hello, CarbonWA friends: Read on for a few reasons why we hope you’ll donate to CarbonWA this Giving Tuesday. Your gift won’t disappear in a large multi-faceted nonprofit budget; it goes straight to lean education, policy development and political advocacy efforts to bring smart climate action to Washington State.

Click Here to Support CarbonWA This Giving Tuesday

Why CarbonWA?

We Elected Climate Champions

We embarked on a new effort this year to elect a climate majority to the state legislature. Our work culminated in the first ever Climate Voters Guide and a program of active campaigning in key legislative races. 5 out of the 7 key candidates we campaigned for WON their election. Thanks in part to your support of our efforts, there will be more climate advocates in the legislature than ever before. 

/var/folders/wd/gsl8x9wd0wqb8gnlzgdjgp_40000gn/T/com.microsoft.Word/WebArchiveCopyPasteTempFiles/collage%20no%20words.jpgWe Led Grassroots Efforts For a Legislative Carbon Tax

Last spring, CarbonWA was at the forefront of a legislative effort to pass a carbon tax. While the bill ultimately fell short, it was groundbreaking in that it brought new stakeholders to the table, passed out of two committees for the first time in the country, won support from the Seattle Times, and helped to inform the work of our colleagues in Massachusetts and across the country. CarbonWA provided robust grassroots lobbying and policy development support in the process. Neither the bill or the process were perfect, but for the first time in recent years climate action was one of the top things on the agenda in Olympia.

 (more…)

What’s next for climate action + CarbonWA candidates win!

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Hello, CarbonWA friends: There is no way around it — the results for climate action this election were mixed. Read on for our take on I-1631, the results from CarbonWA’s efforts to elect climate champions, and the future for climate action in Washington. Thank you to the hundreds of volunteers who worked on the initiative and volunteered for our legislative climate champions. You inspire us to continue.

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Jared Mead

Climate Champions Win Legislative Seats!

We embarked on a new effort this year to elect a climate majority to the state legislature. Our work culminated in the first ever Climate Voters’ Guide and a program of active campaigning in key legislative races. We are thrilled that 5 out of the 7 key climate races we campaigned in are trending our way! 

Dr. Sharon Shewmake

Climate champions Sharon Shewmake, Jared Mead and Debra Entenman are poised to unseat climate do-nothings in the House. In the Senate, Emily Randall is narrowly ahead. Moderate Republican Mark Miloscia lost his Senate seat, but his challenger Claire Wilson is also a climate champion who earned our endorsement. (more…)

Despite I-1631 vote, Washingtonians still demand action on climate

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There is mounting evidence that a growing majority of Americans are concerned about climate change and support climate action. While Initiative 1631 failed to attract majority support, that does not change the fact that Yale University’s extensive research shows 70 percent of Washington voters believe global warming is happening and would support regulations on carbon emissions. Voters are demanding a solution, even if they didn’t accept this one.

I-1631 deserves praise for attracting a broad coalition of support, including from Carbon Washington. Yet the policy failed to attract bipartisan support and contained elements that caused concern, as we highlighted in our analysis of the proposal. Opponents argued a better policy was needed.

The opponents must now stand by their word in calling for a better proposal. We invite supporters and opponents of 1631 to join us in working on proposals that reduce carbon and promise a prosperous, healthy future. Carbon Washington will continue to advocate for solutions that can bridge our deep partisan divides, not enlarge them, and that are effective, equitable, and economically sound. But we cannot do this work alone. We urge everyone, Republicans and Democrats, energy companies and community activists, opponents and proponents of 1631, to join us in the spirit of compromise to fulfill our sacred duty to protect our kids and common home. (more…)

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We need to #ActNOW to mitigate impacts and fuel growth of a low-carbon economy #waleg #divest #climatechange #COP24 #Katowice #UNFCC
Tackle climate or face financial crash, say world's biggest investors

Tackle climate or face financial crash, say world's biggest investors

UN summit urged to end all coal burning and introduce substantial taxes on emissions

www.theguardian.com

Did you see the Australian protests last week?

"As wildfires raged across the country, a heat wave again threatened the Great Barrier Reef and a mining giant announced it would push ahead with a huge coal project..."

#Wildfires #ClimateChange #Carbon

Milou Albrecht, 14, center, speaking to students attending a rally for climate change action at the Old Treasury Building in Melbourne, Australia, on Friday.

Climate Change Protest Draws Thousands of Australian Students

Frustrated by their government‘s failure to curb carbon emissions, students across the country quit school for a day to protest instead.

www.nytimes.com

This year the Los Angeles International Auto Show displayed the latest battery electric, plug-in hybrid, and traditional hybrid models. The show brought several advanced concepts alongside models that will be on the road in 2019.

"When we enact personal change out of climate concern, we show that there is real support for laws aimed at enacting societal change."

#ClimateChange #CarbonAlternatives #GoSolar

Actually, Your Personal Choices Do Make a Difference in Climate Change

Reducing your carbon footprint could make your vote matter more.

slate.com

Interested in Carbon Capture techniques?
"Seawater capture extracts carbon dioxide from the oceans. Plant engineering involves selectively breeding certain plants for traits that increase carbon storage in soils."
#CarbonCapture #CarbonStorage

Cutting emissions still matters. But carbon capture rises as a battlefront.

Climate mitigation strategies tend to focus on emissions reduction. But carbon capture is becoming an equally vital prong of climate action. And the t...

www.csmonitor.com

Feel out of the loop? Our team loves to pull together some of the best content on climate and #policy from across multiple news outlets to provide a comprehensive look at where we are.

Take a look at our recent roundup of fascinating #Climate reads

Climate and policy | Carbon Washington

Stories on climate and environmental policy Articles on Fourth National Climate Assessment from 13 U.S. federal agencies: The World Needs to Quit Coal...

carbonwa.org

Fascinating read from Danny Westneat

"They say hypocrisy is another word for the gap between your aspirations and actions. Whatever you call it, the Evergreen State’s gap is definitely showing."

#Washington #ClimateVoter #CarbonTax

Green hypocrisy? Washington state voters keep proving it’s not easy being green

We told an election-day pollster we were worked up about climate change, even as we voted with the oil companies to do nothing about it. Are we phonie...

www.seattletimes.com

[T]he creation of renewable energy standards and the establishment of clean energy incentives — could gain even more momentum due to what happened in the governors’ races and in state legislatures..."
#Renewables #WindEnergy #CleanEnergy #SolarEnergy

States lead the way on pivotal shift toward renewable energy after midterms

The election of pro-clean energy governors raises hopes of wind and solar industry sectors.

thinkprogress.org

"There’s going to be a battle in coming years over who gets to define ambition and realism in climate policy".

Interesting reflections on what direction climate policy could or should take in the coming years.

What do you think?

US climate politics just got even more polarized. Here’s how Democrats can move forward.

Bipartisanship is unlikely, but progress is possible.

www.vox.com

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What People Are Saying About Reducing Carbon Pollution

“I’m a Republican. I believe that the greenhouse effect is real, that CO2 emissions generated by man is creating our greenhouse gas effect that traps heat, and the planet is warming. A price on carbon — that’s the way to go in my view.”

Lindsey Graham, United States Senator, R-SC

A carbon tax is a good starting point for working toward eventual state and federal agreements that put a price on carbon emissions. If national elder statesmen in the Republican Party can take this idea seriously, so should other Republicans in our statehouse and in Congress. The same goes for Democrats.

The Olympian

"Climate change is the biggest market failure of our time. If the United States is to continue to lead and innovate, we must move away from fossil fuels and focus on developing clean, inexpensive, renewable energy sources. A price on carbon is the best policy to promote this change."

Jim McDermott, Former U.S. Representative (D-WA 7th District)

Scientists and economists agree that the most effective way to free ourselves from fossil fuels is to stop the free lunch for polluters.

Sightline Institute

"Only when 'the economic and social costs of using up shared environmental resources are recognized with transparency and fully borne by those who incur them, not by other peoples or future generations,’ [Pope Benedict XVI] can those actions be considered ethical."

Pope Francis, Encyclical Letter “Laudato si”

The optimal solution is a carbon tax (offset by equivalent tax cuts elsewhere) — the most efficient and market-friendly way to address the negative externalities of energy use. But that approach is highly transparent and less susceptible to manipulation by special-interest lobbying than complicated regulatory schemes. No wonder it never gets any traction.

Richmond Times-Dispatch

“I think that climate change is real. I think that one of the great tragedies of our lives is the Great Barrier Reef dying [and] the environmental consequences of that."

John McCain, United States Senator (R-Arizona)

It is time for more of our elected leaders to join [Governor] Inslee, [and Senators] Carlyle and Palumbo in giving this major issue the attention and care it deserves.

Seattle Times Editorial, Feb. 5, 2018

"If national governments won't take action, your community can . . . We can move our economy town-by-town, state-by-state to renewable energy and a sustainable future." (Watch this dramatic video narrated by DiCaprio.)

Leonardo DiCaprio, Actor and environmentalist

Who We Are

Carbon Washington consists of students, activists, scientists, economists and concerned citizens across the state. All of us believe that we have a moral obligation to reduce carbon pollution and promote clean, renewable energy.

We exist to help design, promote and pass carbon-reduction policies — policies that are effective, equitable, economically sound, evidence-based, and politically feasible — in Washington State and elsewhere.

In 2016, we mounted a statewide campaign to pass Initiative 732 — the revenue-neutral carbon tax we proposed. Economists say carbon taxes are the single-most effective way to get polluters to stop polluting. More than 360,000 citizens signed our petition (a near-record number).

Our initiative was endorsed by a bipartisan group of citizens, business leaders, scientists, economists, public officials, and social and environmental leaders. It attracted worldwide attention. And although the measure did not pass, more than 1.25 million Washingtonians voted in favor of I-732.

Now we’re supporting Initiative 1631. The campaign is being led by other groups, and you can read what they have to say here. You can also read our analysis of how I-1631 compares to I-732 and SB 6203 — the carbon-tax bill that was approved this year by two legislative committees (but which was not voted on by the state Senate).

Beyond that, we’re looking ahead to 2019. We’re exploring ballot measures, legislative bills, and actions that cities can take to cut carbon and unleash clean energy. As always, we prefer bipartisan approaches that make a meaningful difference while appealing to a broad array of citizens.

Are we effective? State Sen. Paul Graves says, “Reducing carbon pollution without harming jobs and families is a tough challenge. It requires thoughtfulness, a clear view of the evidence and the tradeoffs, and a willingness to work with people on both sides of the aisle and both sides of the state. I’m grateful to Carbon Washington for embodying those values.”

You can help us by signing up for our weekly email blast, connecting with us on Facebook and Twitter, and donating so we can do the hard work that needs to be done. You can also join one of our chapters across the state. 

Contact Us

Have a question? Give us a shout!

Please email info@carbonwa.org or call Carbon Washington headquarters at 206-632-1805

Media inquiries only
Please email communications@carbonwa.org or call Samara Villasenor at 206-478-5643. For time-sensitive requests, contact Executive Director Kyle Murphy at (360) 704-0484 or via email at kyle@carbonwa.org.

Office phone
206-632-1805

Mailing address
PO Box 85565
Seattle, WA 98145-1565

Street address
1914 N 34th St., Suite 407
Seattle, WA 98103

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