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Moving Washington State toward zero carbon emissions

Carbon Washington is part of ACT NOW

ACT NOW (Advocates for a Carbon Tax NOW) is a growing coalition of volunteers and more than 30 organizations including Carbon Washington, Audubon Washington, Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL), League of Women Voters, American Sustainable Business Council, Conservatives for Environmental Reform, and others that want to see a carbon tax pass here in Washington State.
 

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News

Pragmatic case for 1631 + doorknocking + climate voters’ guide!

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Hello, CarbonWA friends:  In case you missed it, we released the essential climate change voters’ guide for Washington State! It identifies a number of key races that we need to win for climate action at the state level. Vote, donate, and volunteer because the climate is on the line this election. Don’t believe us? Take a look at the just released IPCC report which projects greater impact and cost of climate change than earlier reports and urges nations to seriously reduce emissions over the next decade.

The Pragmatic Case for 1631

If you’ve been following the Initiative 1631 debate, you’ve probably seen that we endorsed the initiative, but also that some of CarbonWA’s friends and allies are landing on both sides of this one. We’ll level with you: I-1631 isn’t perfect. We liked some of the previous carbon pricing iterations better. But if you are on the fence please read our pragmatic case for why we want you to vote yes: (more…)

Issues Plague Industry Study on I-1631

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A newly released study exploring the impacts of initiative 1631 by the NERA economic consulting group, funded by the No on 1631 coalition, should not be used by lawmakers or voters when evaluating Initiative 1631. Below, a handful of essential issues with the study are explored. Additional technical flaws exist as well, but are not addressed in this analysis.

Betting Against Renewable Energy

A significant unknown facing climate policy advocates and detractors alike is that rate at which cleaner, greener technologies will become affordable and reliable enough for widespread use. Most models address this by modeling multiple scenarios that try to capture this uncertainty.

The NERA study is underpinned by a significantly conservative forecast of future clean energy prices and deployment, produced by the EIA. The EIA is, in general, regarded as a respectable and transparent outlet for energy-related data. However, their future forecasts have come under severe scrutiny as most of their renewable forecasts in recent years have failed to track with actual reality. As one peer reviewed examination of the EIA forecasts put it, “most of EIA’s projections for renewables sharply under-projected generation or capacity.” You can dig into this more here, but a sharply conservative forecast for future renewables growth will skew every result that follows it, and the failure of the NERA study to also present an ‘optimistic’ case, leads to an imbalanced result. Which leads us to our second concern: (more…)

The world has barely 10 years to get climate change under control, U.N. scientists say

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From The Guardian: “The world’s leading climate scientists have warned there is only a dozen years for global warming to be kept to a maximum of 1.5 degrees C [2.7 degrees F], beyond which even half a degree will significantly worsen the risks of drought, floods, extreme heat and poverty for hundreds of millions of people.

“The authors of the landmark report by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released on Monday say urgent and unprecedented changes are needed to reach the target, which they say is affordable and feasible although it lies at the most ambitious end of the Paris agreement pledge to keep temperatures between 1.5C and 2C.

“‘It’s a line in the sand and what it says to our species is that this is the moment and we must act now,’ said Debra Roberts, a co-chair of the working group on impacts. ‘This is the largest clarion bell from the science community and I hope it mobilises people and dents the mood of complacency.’”

 (more…)

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"37 percent of Republicans believe global warming is “very likely” to negatively impact North Carolina coastal communities in the next 50 years. That is nearly triple the percentage of Republicans — 13 percent — who felt that way in 2017." #climatechange

In North Carolina, hurricanes did what scientists could not: Convince Republicans that climate change is real

As polls show their numbers growing, some Republicans say the evidence is right in front of them.

wapo.st

If you’ve been following the initiative 1631 debate, you may have noticed that some of our friends and allies have landed on both sides of the issue. If you are on he fence please read our pragmatic case for why we want you to vote YES.

Pragmatic case for 1631 + doorknocking + climate voters' guide! | Carbon Washington

Hello, CarbonWA friends:  In case you missed it, we released the essential climate change voters‘ guide for Washington State! It ...

carbonwa.org

"A yes vote on I-1631 supports healthy habitats... and healthy places for all of us to live, work and play. A yes vote on I-1631 says we care about future generations... A yes vote on I-1631 says we must act on climate now."
#VOTE #YesOn1631 #ClimateVoter

Viewpoints: Will I-1631’s carbon fee help or hinder? | HeraldNet.com

Pilchuck Audubon says it will aid the environment. A union says we’ll lose jobs and see higher costs.

www.heraldnet.com

Individual action is important, but we have to take on corporate emissions too. One way to do that? Vote #yeson1631 so WA can lead the way! #ActNOW #IPCC #climatechange via @voxdotcom

10 ways to accelerate progress against climate change

From pricing carbon to shifting diets, here’s what we need to prioritize now.

www.vox.com

Elway polling finds I-1631 carbon fee is going to be close, VERY close. With 25 days left until the election there couldn't be a more critical opportunity or a clearer directive to act!

Poll: Nation's first carbon fee leading among voters

The latest attempt to rein in Washington polluters has a 14-point lead, despite big-money foes.

crosscut.com

A list that prioritizes "1) Price carbon emissions. 2) The fossil fuel industry is meanwhile still getting a number of direct and indirect subsidies... $20 billion a year."
In 27 days be a #SmartClimateVoter; see our Climate Voters Guide and #ActOnClimate

10 ways to accelerate progress against climate change

From pricing carbon to shifting diets, here’s what we need to prioritize now.

www.vox.com

. @NobelPrize recipient, Dr. Nordhaus shares “the most efficient remedy for the problems caused by greenhouse gas emissions would be a global scheme of carbon taxes that are uniformly imposed on all countries.”

#CarbonTax #IPCC #GlobalWarming

The Tesoro Los Angeles oil refinery in California. Economists have long been enthusiastic about carbon pricing because of the idea’s simplicity.

New U.N. Climate Report Says Put a High Price on Carbon

Most nations don't tax carbon. Those that do tax emissions have not set carbon prices high enough to bring deep reductions in carbon pollution.

www.nytimes.com

Did you know that nearly 1/3 of Seattle’s #climate #pollution comes from buildings? Seattle's Office of #Sustainability and Environment report reveals "...benchmarked buildings are reducing climate emissions, saving money, and improving performance."

We have an urgent need to phase out fossil fuels. The @IPCC_CH outlines their findings in a new report.

We have opportunities to #ActOnClimate by our personal choices, by voting, and by having conversations about the urgency of this topic.

#PriceCarbon

The world has barely 10 years to get climate change under control, U.N. scientists say | Carbon Washington

From The Guardian: ”The world‘s leading climate scientists have warned there is only a dozen years for global warming to be kept to a maxi...

carbonwa.org

Reminder, today is last day to register to vote online or by mail!

New Washington state voters can register in person until October 29th.

Make sure your coworkers, neighbors, and friends have registered.

#Vote #ClimateVoter #VoteOnClimate

The Secretary of State is the state's chief elections officer, chief corporations officer, and supervisor of the State Archives and State Library.

www.sos.wa.gov

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What People Are Saying About Reducing Carbon Pollution

“I’m a Republican. I believe that the greenhouse effect is real, that CO2 emissions generated by man is creating our greenhouse gas effect that traps heat, and the planet is warming. A price on carbon — that’s the way to go in my view.”

Lindsey Graham, United States Senator, R-SC

A carbon tax is a good starting point for working toward eventual state and federal agreements that put a price on carbon emissions. If national elder statesmen in the Republican Party can take this idea seriously, so should other Republicans in our statehouse and in Congress. The same goes for Democrats.

The Olympian

"Climate change is the biggest market failure of our time. If the United States is to continue to lead and innovate, we must move away from fossil fuels and focus on developing clean, inexpensive, renewable energy sources. A price on carbon is the best policy to promote this change."

Jim McDermott, Former U.S. Representative (D-WA 7th District)

Scientists and economists agree that the most effective way to free ourselves from fossil fuels is to stop the free lunch for polluters.

Sightline Institute

"Only when 'the economic and social costs of using up shared environmental resources are recognized with transparency and fully borne by those who incur them, not by other peoples or future generations,’ [Pope Benedict XVI] can those actions be considered ethical."

Pope Francis, Encyclical Letter “Laudato si”

The optimal solution is a carbon tax (offset by equivalent tax cuts elsewhere) — the most efficient and market-friendly way to address the negative externalities of energy use. But that approach is highly transparent and less susceptible to manipulation by special-interest lobbying than complicated regulatory schemes. No wonder it never gets any traction.

Richmond Times-Dispatch

“I think that climate change is real. I think that one of the great tragedies of our lives is the Great Barrier Reef dying [and] the environmental consequences of that."

John McCain, United States Senator (R-Arizona)

It is time for more of our elected leaders to join [Governor] Inslee, [and Senators] Carlyle and Palumbo in giving this major issue the attention and care it deserves.

Seattle Times Editorial, Feb. 5, 2018

"If national governments won't take action, your community can . . . We can move our economy town-by-town, state-by-state to renewable energy and a sustainable future." (Watch this dramatic video narrated by DiCaprio.)

Leonardo DiCaprio, Actor and environmentalist

Who We Are

Carbon Washington consists of students, activists, scientists, economists and concerned citizens across the state. All of us believe that we have a moral obligation to reduce carbon pollution and promote clean, renewable energy.

We exist to help design, promote and pass carbon-reduction policies — policies that are effective, equitable, economically sound, evidence-based, and politically feasible — in Washington State and elsewhere.

In 2016, we mounted a statewide campaign to pass Initiative 732 — the revenue-neutral carbon tax we proposed. Economists say carbon taxes are the single-most effective way to get polluters to stop polluting. More than 360,000 citizens signed our petition (a near-record number).

Our initiative was endorsed by a bipartisan group of citizens, business leaders, scientists, economists, public officials, and social and environmental leaders. It attracted worldwide attention. And although the measure did not pass, more than 1.25 million Washingtonians voted in favor of I-732.

Now we’re supporting Initiative 1631. The campaign is being led by other groups, and you can read what they have to say here. You can also read our analysis of how I-1631 compares to I-732 and SB 6203 — the carbon-tax bill that was approved this year by two legislative committees (but which was not voted on by the state Senate).

Beyond that, we’re looking ahead to 2019. We’re exploring ballot measures, legislative bills, and actions that cities can take to cut carbon and unleash clean energy. As always, we prefer bipartisan approaches that make a meaningful difference while appealing to a broad array of citizens.

Are we effective? State Sen. Joe Fain says, “Carbon Washington is one of the few groups working to bridge the divide between the left and right on key environmental policies in our state. Rather than weaponizing environmentalism, they work to educate the public while proposing nonpartisan solutions that respect the complexity of this crucial issue.”

And State Sen. Paul Graves says, “Reducing carbon pollution without harming jobs and families is a tough challenge. It requires thoughtfulness, a clear view of the evidence and the tradeoffs, and a willingness to work with people on both sides of the aisle and both sides of the state. I’m grateful to Carbon Washington for embodying those values.”

You can help us by signing up for our weekly email blast, connecting with us on Facebook and Twitter, and donating so we can do the hard work that needs to be done. You can also join one of our chapters across the state. 

Contact Us

Have a question? Give us a shout!

Please email info@carbonwa.org or call Carbon Washington headquarters at 206-632-1805

Media inquiries only
Please email communications@carbonwa.org or call Samara Villasenor at 206-478-5643. For time-sensitive requests, contact Executive Director Kyle Murphy at (360) 704-0484 or via email at kyle@carbonwa.org.

Office phone
206-632-1805

Mailing address
PO Box 85565
Seattle, WA 98145-1565

Street address
1914 N 34th St., Suite 407
Seattle, WA 98103

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