Carbon Washington's I-732 Media

A grassroots organization focused on accelerating
the transition to a vibrant clean-energy economy.

We advocate for carbon reduction policies that are effective, equitable, economically sound, evidence-based, and politically feasible.

Carbon Washington is part of ACT NOW

ACT NOW (Advocates for a Carbon Tax NOW) is a growing coalition of volunteers and more than 30 organizations including Carbon Washington, Audubon Washington, Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL), League of Women Voters, American Sustainable Business Council, Conservatives for Environmental Reform, and others that want to see a carbon tax pass here in Washington State.
 

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News

Policy Blog: Can a City Price Carbon?

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leonard-cotte-paris

The election results from initiative 732 demonstrate that in Bellingham, Tacoma, Seattle and other Washington cities, support for climate action via carbon price is strong and politically viable. It prompts the question, why not start here? Launching carbon pricing as a patchwork within Washington State would both show the viability of the policy and create an incentive to level the playing field with a statewide policy. Washington cities, with Seattle in the lead, have also pledged themselves to serious carbon emission reductions by joining the Paris Agreement and other agreements, despite having made little progress towards the goals thus far.   (more…)

CarbonWA in Mother Jones + $2500 added to the match. GIVE NOW!

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ACTNOWHello, CarbonWA friends:

Check out this recent Mother Jones article, “Will Washington Pass the Nation’s First Carbon Tax?” featuring CarbonWA and the upcoming legislative session. As we outlined in our legislative analysis, the path is tough this session, but not impossible. Stay tuned for more on 2018, but first, read on for an update on our fundraising match.

Thanks to the tremendous support of dozens of donors we’ve raised $4300 completing our match well before the end-of-the-month deadline! If you’ve already given to the match — thank you. By completing this match, we can fund our operation through the end of the year. However, to get a running start into next year our board has offered to match an additional $2,500 bringing the new fundraising goal to $6500! (more…)

Part II: Prospects for Climate Action by Initiative in 2018

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Hello, CarbonWA friends: We hope you enjoyed the first part of our 2018 series, focusing on the prospects for legislative action. Read on for the initiative prospects for 2018! But first, check out these recent media hits from CarbonWA including “Washington groups push renewed carbon tax push” in Carbon Pulse, a letter to the editor from supporter Zach Stednick in the Seattle Times (“Washington can distinguish itself as the first state to implement a carbon tax”), and in the Washington State Wire (“A look ahead to a 2018 climate initiative“). We’ll kick off our initiative analysis with this quote from the Wire story:

“There are those of us who are looking at these multiple efforts and thinking ‘nothing is for sure yet’, so we need to make a plan to ensure something goes to voters that is politically viable and effective at reducing carbon.”

The Landscape 

The landscape for a ballot initiative in 2018 is defined largely by voter turnout and sentiment towards taxes and climate.

 (more…)

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Carbon WA

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"Finance, not politics, may turn out to be the soft underbelly of the climate monster." #DIVEST #ACTNOW https://t.co/MGAKA2qs6J 
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https://t.co/5Vh57BA1iH CA and WA are two states that have just joined a "Carbon Pricing in the Americas" declarati… https://t.co/uwN84Hrsqi 
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CarbonWA ED @kylemurphy514 talking about responding to climate change with @SenatorPalumbo and @WAPolicyGreen at th… https://t.co/DwtwGweqIf 
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RT @AdeleCMorris:My new blog with @aparnamath: Fill the gaps in the tax bill with a #carbontax and expanded benefits for working fam… https://t.co/wqsBhtBatl 
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The deal sets up a way to finance the decommissioning of Colstrip units 1 and 2 by 2022. It also shortens the time… https://t.co/nevwVQBPXl 
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Encouraging news from #WashingtonState - Surge of Carbon Pricing Proposals Coming in the New Year... #CarbonPricinghttps://t.co/eKJCHyc53A 
Carbon Washington  @carbonwa
Moody's Investor Service, a top credit agency to cities and states is warning US cities and states to prepare for… https://t.co/R4imCVV1vt 
Carbon Washington  @carbonwa
Breaking news from @Bloomberg: America Crowns a New Pollution King "Power plants are no longer the biggest source… https://t.co/MmPrIFpZs8 

What People Are Saying About Reducing Carbon Pollution

“I’m a Republican. I believe that the greenhouse effect is real, that CO2 emissions generated by man is creating our greenhouse gas effect that traps heat, and the planet is warming. A price on carbon — that’s the way to go in my view.”

Lindsey Graham, United States Senator, R-SC

A carbon tax is a good starting point for working toward eventual state and federal agreements that put a price on carbon emissions. If national elder statesmen in the Republican Party can take this idea seriously, so should other Republicans in our statehouse and in Congress. The same goes for Democrats.

The Olympian

"Climate change is the biggest market failure of our time. If the United States is to continue to lead and innovate, we must move away from fossil fuels and focus on developing clean, inexpensive, renewable energy sources. A price on carbon is the best policy to promote this change."

Jim McDermott, Former U.S. Representative (D-WA 7th District)

Scientists and economists agree that the most effective way to free ourselves from fossil fuels is to stop the free lunch for polluters.

Sightline Institute

"Only when 'the economic and social costs of using up shared environmental resources are recognized with transparency and fully borne by those who incur them, not by other peoples or future generations,’ [Pope Benedict XVI] can those actions be considered ethical."

Pope Francis, Encyclical Letter “Laudato si”

The optimal solution is a carbon tax (offset by equivalent tax cuts elsewhere) — the most efficient and market-friendly way to address the negative externalities of energy use. But that approach is highly transparent and less susceptible to manipulation by special-interest lobbying than complicated regulatory schemes. No wonder it never gets any traction.

Richmond Times-Dispatch

“I think that climate change is real. I think that one of the great tragedies of our lives is the Great Barrier Reef dying [and] the environmental consequences of that."

John McCain, United States Senator (R-Arizona)

"If national governments won't take action, your community can . . . We can move our economy town-by-town, state-by-state to renewable energy and a sustainable future." (Watch this dramatic video narrated by DiCaprio.)

Leonardo DiCaprio, Actor and environmentalist

Who We Are

Carbon Washington consists of students, activists, scientists, economists and concerned citizens across the state. All of us believe that we have a moral obligation to reduce carbon pollution and promote clean, renewable energy.

In 2016, we mounted a statewide campaign to pass Initiative 732 — the revenue-neutral carbon tax we proposed. Economists say carbon taxes are the single-most effective way to get polluters to stop polluting. More than 360,000 citizens signed our petition (a near-record number).

Our initiative was endorsed by a bipartisan group of citizens, business leaders, scientists, economists, public officials, and social and environmental leaders. It attracted worldwide attention. And although the measure did not pass, more than 1.25 million Washingtonians voted in favor of I-732.

Now Carbon Washington is charting its future. We are focused on making an impact in 2018 at the state and local level. We’re exploring 2018 ballot measures, legislative bills, and actions that cities can take to cut carbon and unleash clean energy.

Longer-term, we are evolving into an organization that will help design, promote and pass carbon-reduction policies — policies that are effective, equitable, economically sound, evidence-based, and politically feasible — in Washington State and elsewhere.

You can help us by signing up for our weekly email blast, connecting with us on Facebook and Twitter, and donating so we can do the hard work that needs to be done. You can also join one of our chapters across the state. 

Contact Us

Have a question? Give us a shout!

Please email info@carbonwa.org or call Carbon Washington headquarters at 206-632-1805

Media inquiries only
Please email communications@carbonwa.org or call Samara Villasenor at 206-478-5643. For time-sensitive requests, contact Executive Director Kyle Murphy at (360) 704-0484 or via email at kyle@carbonwa.org.

Office phone
206-632-1805

Mailing address
PO Box 85565
Seattle, WA 98145-1565

Street address
1914 N 34th St., Suite 407
Seattle, WA 98103

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